Announcing the Music Notation Project Wiki

We are pleased to announce the Music Notation Project Wiki, a new addition to the Community section of our website. Like the MNMA‘s quarterly newsletter (Music Notation News), and our Forum (Google Group), this wiki will provide a means for our community to share ideas, knowledge, proposals, examples, experiments, images, and sheet music for alternative notation systems.

Our forum already provides an easy way to share and discuss such material and keeps a chronological archive of posts that can be easily searched. However, the wiki will complement the forum and the rest of our site by providing a more robust platform for collaborating and topically organizing this community-generated content. Organizing this material in the wiki will make it more accessible to new visitors browsing our site, and increase the breadth and depth of content available on our site.

Our wiki runs on the same open-source MediaWiki software that powers Wikipedia, and so its interface may be familiar. However, our wiki’s purpose is not to provide another comprehensive encyclopedia. It is to simply provide a collaborative space in which to collect and organize the content being created and shared by our community.

Over the long term, the most significant role of the wiki may be as a place to collect examples of sheet music in alternative notation systems. Building such a collection will make it much easier for anyone to really experiment with various alternative notation systems (and ultimately start using them).

Please feel free to contact us if you would like to contribute to the wiki and need help getting started. We look forward to seeing the wiki grow with your help. Let us know what you think.

 

6 thoughts on “Announcing the Music Notation Project Wiki

  1. Dear Music Notation

    I remember when I first met Constance. I was a student attending the University of San Diego. I was a music major and I looked her up one day while I was preparing for my master’s thesis. It was 1972 or 1973. I had been studying Helmholtz and attended lectures by Roger Reynolds and Paulina Oliveros. It was an amazing time to study music. She had the most amazing pipe organ built within her home that overlooked the inland valley.

    I visted her frequently as she was lonely for company while her husband was away. I was the one who contacted Isaac Stern about her notagraph. I remember calling him up and scolding him for not paying attention to her work. She had studied with Alan Berg for goodness sake! How cool is that. I also sent a copy of her Notagraph document to Darmstadt’s School of New Musik. She called me her ” littlest angel” .

    She was so far ahead of her time……… She was an amazing woman and influenced my life for many years after.

    It is good to see that she is remembered.

    Thank you for your good work.

    Carol Collins, CEO
    Spiralcat of Maryland

  2. Dear Carol Collins,

    Thank you for posting your comment. It is good to hear from someone who knew Constance, and to hear your memories of her. If she studied with Berg, she may have known of Schoenberg’s chromatic staff music notation system (given Berg’s and Schoenberg’s close ties):

    http://musicnotation.org/musicnotations/3linesmajorthird.html#schoenberg

    At any rate, it seems that she was familiar with 12-tone music and that was probably an inspiration to her to design her chromatic staff notation system.

    Thank you for your encouragement on our efforts.

    Best regards,
    Paul Morris

  3. I remember when I first met Constance. I was a student attending the University of San Diego. I was a music major and I looked her up one day while I was preparing for my master’s thesis. It was 1972 or 1973. I had been studying Helmholtz and attended lectures by Roger Reynolds and Paulina Oliveros. It was an amazing time to study music. She had the most amazing pipe organ built within her home that overlooked the inland valley.
    +1

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